English translation of the Roman Missal: Archbishop Hart issues an update

The following statement from Archbishop Denis Hart was issued to the Melbourne Archdiocese on Friday:

English translation of the Roman Missal
Friday 4 February 2011

The only altar missal in English approved for Australia, with the Australian supplement and variations approved by the Holy See is in preparation (in conjunction with England and Wales, and Scotland) by the Catholic Truth Society, London, and will be sold in Australia by St Paul’s from whom you will receive information in due course. There is the larger size (with superior binding and illustrations) suitable for parishes, a medium size (suitable for smaller chapels) and a hand size. Under no circumstances should missals from other countries be purchased as they lack the Australian proper and variations. You will find that the new missals are of a higher quality and durability than the former one.

For the people, St Paul’s are also preparing Sunday and Weekday Missals with readings, and other people’s aids. It seems that any revision of the Lectionary is distant by a number of years.

The National Liturgical Commission is preparing a laminated people’s card with the new texts for the people’s use when they are introduced on Pentecost Sunday (June 12) and resources for those parishes who use overheads will be available soon on the Bishops’ Conference website.

Musical settings of the new texts now available include Mass of St Francis – Dr Paul Taylor (Archbishop’s Office for Evangelisation).
Revised for the new texts: Mass Shalom (Colin Smith) and Mass of Creation (Haughen) are available from Willow Connection Pty Ltd, C/- IDS, Box 519 GROVEDALE Vic., 3216. email: orders@idsoceania.com

Dr Geoffrey Cox has also prepared a Gregorian Chant Mass (adaptations of Mass XV and XVI) with the music and accompaniment for the eucharistic acclamations which appear in the missal.

Details of other settings approved for Australia can be found at www.cam.org.au/evangelisation/changes/changes-to-music.html or on google Australian Catholic Bishops Conference: National Liturgical Music Board.

Enquiries to Damian Coleridge or Paul Taylor at the Archbishop’s office for Evangelisation.

I trust this will be helpful, With every good wish,

+ Denis J. Hart,
ARCHBISHOP OF MELBOURNE

Yes, very helpful, thanks, Your Grace. It is always good to know what is going to happen. I had been wondering about what version of the lectionary would be in the new missals. I knew that the lectionary was being revised, but I hadn’t even heard whether a particular translation had been adopted yet, and I couldn’t see how they were going to have the revised lectionary ready in time to publish with the new missal. Answer: they’re not, and so the current JB readings will appear in the new people’s missals. Which means some stage down the line a new edition with the revised lectionary in it will have to be purchased.

As far as the musical settings go, I have Paul Taylor’s setting. I think many parishes in Melbourne and elsewhere will find this a singable version. Paul won’t be offended, I hope, if I say that my preference will still be for Dr Cox’s accompaniment to the standard chants of the new missal (a copy of which Dr Cox has loaned to me). Unfortunately, these accompaniments are not yet published, and are only available for use in workshops etc. Still, if you learn to sing the chants that are readily available on the net now unaccompanied, you will be set for when Dr Cox’s Missa Cantata is published.

This morning my parish priest announced that he will begin to introduce the new texts from March. Here in Melbourne we are being encouraged to introduce the sung people’s sections (Kyrie, Gloria, Creed, Sanctus, Acclamations, Agnus Dei). I expect that we will begin simply with the Sanctus, which has one small change to it. There are no changes to the Kyrie and the Agnus Dei – and the Gloria and Creed are more complex. Note that responsive Glorias are discouraged in preference to “straight through” settings in which the people sing the whole text.

About Schütz

I am Catholic, married to Cathy, father of Maddy & Mia. Since 2002, I have been the Executive Officer of the Ecumenical & Interfaith Commission of the Archdiocese of Melbourne. I was once a Lutheran pastor, but a "year of grace" and soul-searching led me into the Catholic Church. It was a bumpy ride, but with the support of my (still Lutheran) wife, I was finally confirmed on June 16, 2003.
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35 Responses to English translation of the Roman Missal: Archbishop Hart issues an update

  1. marcel says:

    There are three historical paths that could follow the implemtation of the new translation: a permanent co-existence between the somewhat improved Novus Ordo and the Traditional Latin Mass; an Hegelian mutual enrichment whereby the revised Novus Ordo and the Traditional Mass move towards one another with a view to permenantly adopting a hybrid, rather than having two rites; or, thirdly, the eventual abandonment of the Novus Ordo in favour of the Traditional Mass.

    I hope and pray the third path is what lies ahead. However, the gladdening part of the whole revised Novus Ordo exercise is that those who pine for the ‘glory days’ of the Bugnini experiment are now becoming increasingly irrelevant.

    • Schütz says:

      I think you are confusing the “Novus Ordo” as such with a translation of it, Marcel. We are getting a new translation of the Ordinary Rite, not an “improvement” of the Rite itself. Personally, I think a lot of complaints about the Novus Ordo are rather on the superficial level of how it is usually celebrated (ie. poorly), rather than the Rite itself. For instance, the use of the vernacular (in any version) is not essential to the celebration of the Ordinary Rite, which (“ordinarily” or “normatively”) is in Latin, just like the Extraordinary Rite. If there is any rub-off between the two forms of the Rite – and I really don’t think there will be much since they are rarely both celebrated regularly in the same parish for the same bunch of people by the same priest – it will be that the Extraordinary form will remind us of how the Ordinary Form can be celebrated WELL.

      • Henrietta says:

        Couldn’t agree more. When I got married, we had a ‘Novus Ordo’ Mass but it was in Latin and ‘ad orientum’…..what a difference it made!

        Regarding the new Mass settings, We are doing the Mass of ‘Our Lady Help of Christians’ by Richard Connolly. We introduced the new Kyrie andGloria on Sunday and will introduce the rest of the Mass in March.

        Does anyone know if the chants for the Priest have been done yet, because the Priests at my Church are keen to learn how to sing it…(yes I know I’m blessed to have Priests eager to sing!)

        • Gareth says:

          Opus Dei priests sometimes celebrate Mass like this in their private chapels on Saturday’s – if you know them well enough, you can tag along although it would probably have to be in a female house.

  2. Joshua says:

    Just heard this morning at Mass: Archbishop Doyle of Hobart thinks that there will be little benefit to Tasmanian Catholics (his terminology) from the implementation of the new translation. I’m not sure if the implication was that Tasmanian priests will simply not bother to bring it in, and stick with the old ICEL translation…

    Given my experience of this Archdiocese, I wouldn’t be surprised.

    • Peter Golding says:

      I understand Arch.Doyle turns 75 this year and will retire.Perhaps he is already in retirement mode and cannot be bothered putting in the effort to ensure that the new translation is properly implemented.

    • Gareth says:

      Who told you that Josh?

      • Tony says:

        This is how the ‘Cloister Countdown’ would have started I dare say. It always use to amaze me how those professing such ‘orthodoxy’ would unashamedly celebrate the coming retirement of a bishop. In any other context this would have been seen to be evidence of ‘dissidence’. It’s funny how it works.

        • Gareth says:

          I know the Bishop discussed personally and needless to say, in this case I think he would probably be the first one to be holding a celebratory party.

          • Joshua says:

            Could you put in a good word for the Latin Mass community then?

            We may be irritating, but if he would be kind enough to read through Summorum Pontificum I’m sure he’d see that our requests are legitimate, and that our grumbling would cease if we could have a weekly Latin Mass.

            • Gareth says:

              Josh: Could you put in a good word for the Latin Mass community then?
              We may be irritating, but if he would be kind enough to read through Summorum Pontificum I’m sure he’d see that our requests are legitimate, and that our grumbling would cease if we could have a weekly Latin Mass.

              Gareth: Josh, I have attended the TLM in Hobart on an irregular basis (on average once every two months) for the past ten years and know the majority of the regulars. I consider myself a supporter, albeit with some reservations.

              I have thought about the constant rumblings about having a weekly Latin Mass deeply and I would have to say if I was in the Bishop’s shoes, sorry I am NOT entirely sure that the request would be a positive move.

              There are a variety of reasons I have come to this conclusion, but one of the main reasons is that there are just too many ‘issues’ amongst some (I stress some) community members.

              I don’t know of any other church community that has had such problems, and it all gets back to Diocese office. As bad and unsupportive as the Bishop and his priests are, I have found what I have mentioned above personally deeply disturbing and discouraging.

              I mention this in public, because I have personally tried to discuss these problems with others but they are simply shrugged off. In the end, I have given up caring.

              If you want to talk about this in private, feel free to contact me via e-mail with my permission.

              I do take your point though that the something should be done in the Diocese or any other Diocese to promote traditional practices. Traditional Catholicism doesnt just have to happen at the TLM, it could also benefit the local parish or diocese level.

              Outside of the TLM, practically next to nothing occurs and this is seriously sad considering there may be a number of traditionally or orthodox minded Catholics who may not necessarily attend the TLM, but would like to see something happen

        • Joshua says:

          His Grace has made it clear that, whatever Summorum Pontificum may say, one priest only is allowed to say a Latin Mass once a month in his archdiocese. Petitions to Rome have been filed.

          I honestly reckon that priests would surely be happy to “have the conservatives out of their hair” if such persons went to a weekly Latin Mass (and yes, we know sufficient priests are available to say it). It frankly strikes me as a rather dog-in-the-manger attitude to find His Grace so angrily opposed to what is permitted.

          Hence our best wishes for his impending retirement: as we say to each other, we couldn’t get a worse bishop – could we?

          • Gareth says:

            Josh: (and yes, we know sufficient priests are available to say it).

            Gareth: Who – ???, because I don’t know one single priest who would be available besides perhaps one of the Nigerian priest who surprsingly did a great job at their guest apperance.

            But considering, he has been shifted off to wait for it – Oatlands, not sure if that is possible.

            Josh: It frankly strikes me as a rather dog-in-the-manger attitude to find His Grace so angrily opposed to what is permitted.

            Gareth: OK, the Bishop has never been the greatest supporter, but that is not the full story.

            See above. Like I said, you can contact me personally to discuss this, if you deem necessary.

        • Joshua says:

          I’m sure many will celebrate when Pell retires. I wish I could delight in our Archbishop, but in all honesty I can’t.

          • Tony says:

            I’m sure many will celebrate when Pell retires.

            You’re probably right but my point was that having a go at +Pell is seen as dissent while having a go at someone like +Doyle is not.

            I’m not accusing you particularly, it’s just an observation culminating in the now defunct (I think?) countdown.

            • Gareth says:

              but then that could be easily reversed for all those that take cheap shots at Cardinal Pell for no particular reason.

            • Tony says:

              Yes indeed it could, Garrison, but those who take potshots at +Pell don’t parade themselves as orthodox either.

              My understanding is that being ‘loyal to the Magisterium’ would not allow for public ‘dissent’ directed towards the Bishop who is, for all intents and purposes, the embodiment of the Magisterium in that dio.

              It’s just incongruous is all I’m sayin’.

            • Joshua says:

              Among those I know, I kid you not, several (not me) view Pell as a dangerous liberal!!!

            • Gareth says:

              If the Bishop is being a tool, why would he be not beyond criticism?

              Above all, the one that betrayed Our Lord was an apostle (and hence first Bishop).

  3. Gareth says:

    I have a pretty out-there hypothetical for you Josh. If the Archdiocese of Hobart had what orthodox/traditional leaning Catholics considered a pretty good Bishop, do you think things would be THAT much different?

    • Joshua says:

      Yes, I do.

      Consider that at the last priests’ retreat in Tasmania, our Archbishop invited Bp Pat Power from Canberra to come preach it: and Power gave the usual talks about how the Church should change her discipline regarding the divorced-and-remarried and same-sex-attracted. Did His Grace question this dissing of Catholic doctrine? No, he encouraged the older priests to maintain their progressive spirit, and alluded caustically to the younger, more conservative priests (the three Nigerians on loan to the Archdiocese in the other words, there are no other young ones).

      Consider how one of the Nigerians has been moved to more and more remote country postings because he is “too Eucharistic” and preaches about sin too often.

      I do feel sorry for the Archbishop, as I think for a shy, retiring man the task of being bishop would be hard, but I disagree with his stance toward the self-defined liberal or progressive wing. Apparently he’s just knocked back an application for the “40 Days for Life” youth pro-life movement to be set up in Tasmania. Parishioners I know tell me they think he supports the Greens and their outlook.

    • Joshua says:

      Of course, given the calibre of the local clergy, I doubt things would change overnight, but hopefully a new bishop, and an energetic building up of young priests (from outside the State if need be) would help greatly, particularly as many of the clergy – including those in positions of power and influence – are all in Doyle’s age-group or near enough and will themselves be retiring over the near to medium term. Having lived in Melbourne and in Perth, and knowing something of the wider Australian and world Catholic scene, I find Tasmanian Catholicism very inward-looking and seventies-feeling, more in line with the way things are in Queensland. It can feel quite schizophrenic to try and understand the outlook here compared to what I know of through laity, priests and my own theological studies.

  4. Joshua says:

    Sorry, David and everyone, for grumbling so!

    I love my home State, but I do terribly miss my Traditional Mass parish over in Perth, where I was really involved in serving Mass and singing in the choir, helping out Father and other parishioners; and we had such camaraderie and fun together. Parish life was a round of Masses, devotions, adoration, catechism, parish fetes and dinners and excursions, even the annual week-long parish silent retreat! It was great to have friends with whom to talk theology. Being back in the Ordinary Form, when I’d grown unfamiliar with it, is depressing, comparing the standard of preaching and liturgy and singing and, yes, “active/actual participation” to what I had before. After you’ve been used to singing Gregorian chant, and having polyphonic Masses for great feasts, plus a professional organist, it is jarring to come back to “As One Voice”. Overall, there is not the piety nor the interest in religion that I experienced. I was happy and now I feel alienated. Sorry to grumble.

    • Tony says:

      My experience of those who promote the Latin Mass are mostly on-line and with few exceptions, I’ve found them hostile and dripping with contempt for anyone who supports the NO.

      Your veiled reference to AOV hints at it a just a little.

      I’m sorry you’re feeling alienated and I hope that the group your involved in aren’t their own worst enemy like those I’ve come across on line.

      • Gareth says:

        I didn’t think there was anything untoward in the comment about ‘As One Voice’, Tony.

        I genuinely find the music at the average Catholic parish to be pretty un-inspiring and can’t believe any parish council or priest would think that it is any way attractive or professional .

        I think Josh in a conversation once said it right that if an alien was to appear from out of space and ask ‘waht is religion’ and be sent to a average Catholic parish, I don’t think they would be very impressed.

        I think that is why some people may find some solace in TLM communities as well, at least they take the presentation of certain aspects of the liturgy as something to be presented in as professional manner as possible.

        • Tony says:

          I didn’t think there was anything untoward in the comment about ‘As One Voice’, Tony.

          Hence the reference to ‘veiled’, Garth.

          I genuinely find the music at the average Catholic parish to be pretty un-inspiring and can’t believe any parish council or priest would think that it is any way attractive or professional .

          Thus it always was even in the good old days before VatII. ‘Average’ parishes are hard pressed to organise high standard music.

          I think Josh in a conversation once said it right that if an alien was to appear from out of space and ask ‘waht is religion’ and be sent to a average Catholic parish, I don’t think they would be very impressed.

          I’m not sure I’ve come across a stranger benchmark or speculation so unfounded!

          I think that is why some people may find some solace in TLM communities as well, at least they take the presentation of certain aspects of the liturgy as something to be presented in as professional manner as possible.

          Yes, there are exceptions. Another is communities with ethnic ties. But increasing the standards and participation on a wider front is difficult for all sorts of reasons.

          For example — and not meaning to pick on Josh in a personal way — say Josh has the talent and experience to contribute to the music ministry in his parish but, because the prefered music is not to Josh’s taste and others don’t like his taste, he stays right away.

          It could also happen in the other direction, ie, a parish is far to conservative for people with more contemporary tastes. Ideally, a parish would cater for a range of tastes, but that requires a optimal number to be involved and that’s just not there.

          • Gareth says:

            Tony: ‘Average’ parishes are hard pressed to organise high standard music.

            Gareth: C’mon Tony, it wouldn’t be that hard to replace ‘Here I am Lord’, ‘Come as You are,’ ‘We remember’ ‘Here in this Place (Gather Us In)’, or the worst offender of the lot ‘the Galilee Song’ with some semi half-decent hymns.

            The problem with most Catholic hymns are they are from the 1970s and dare I say stopped being trendy in the 1970s.

            When I was in my teens, I used to dig Wu-Tang (don’t worry I have moved on since then) so imagine how DAGGY it was once I rolled up to church and had to put up with Marty Haugen’s greatest hits played from a tape recorder.

            If the Catholic Church is serious about sacred music, it needs to move one way or another – it is either contemporary hymns from the 2000s not 1970s or decent traditional hymns.

            And don’t tell me people don’t enjoy a good traditional hymn – put Ava Maria on and people will start belting it out as opposed to pissy Dan Schutte’s ‘Sing a new song to the Lord’.

            I can’t believe priests sit there each week scracting their heads on why not as many people attend Mass when we have this to offer the world?

            • Tony says:

              [I acknowlege that you are calling me by my preferred name and reciprocate]

              Gareth,

              C’mon Tony, it wouldn’t be that hard to replace ‘Here I am Lord’, ‘Come as You are,’ ‘We remember’ ‘Here in this Place (Gather Us In)’, or the worst offender of the lot ‘the Galilee Song’ with some semi half-decent hymns.

              Wouldn’t it? Have you tried?

              About a year and half ago David told us about the hymns that rated a ‘no’ from As One Voice by the National Liturgical Commission Music Board.

              Since that confident exposition I’ve heard absolutely nothing about it. The hymns you mention are still going strong despite your contempt.

              We sing a variety of hymns in our parish including many on the ‘banned’ list and it’s made abundantly clear to us that the parishioners love them as much as they love the traditional stuff.

              Maybe our parish is the exception, but I doubt it and if you can do better by all means try.

              We also do contemporary hymns and traditional hymns which, I’m confident, would be approved by the NLCMB.

              We have a good young choirmaster, who is anything but liberal, and a long tradition of having one or two choirs in the parish, but still we struggle to get good participation.

              Armchair critics are a dime a dozen but people who turn up to practice week in and week out are rare. Competant, enthusiastic leaders are ever rarer.

              If you start pulling out much-loved hymns because they’re on some list from some committee nobody knows anything about, you’re going to find it even harder to get support.

              It’s probably why ‘the list’ went down without a trace.

            • Gareth says:

              Are you saying Dan Schutte or Marty Haugen are much loved???

              I told you need to get out more Tons.

              You may be singing ‘Sing a New Song’ or ‘Let us Build the City Of God’ in the shower, but I think you would find most Catholics are over it.

            • Gareth says:

              I noticed the Galilee song on your favourite song list – i can’t believe anyone thought that was a hymn to begin with

            • Tony says:

              So Gareth, given that it’s ‘easy’, what have you done about improving music in your parish?

              And, for the record, I’m not particularly obsessed with hymns from the 70s, I have wide tastes (because I do ‘get out’). But neither do I dismiss them out of hand.

              The 70s was a very creative period but like all creative periods only a few works will survive the test of time. Most will fade out when that generation passes on as will the favourites of the following generations. Some will endure and you may be hearing ‘Come As You Are’ when you’re a grumpy old bugger.

  5. Gareth says:

    Josh: Consider how one of the Nigerians has been moved to more and more remote country postings because he is “too Eucharistic” and preaches about sin too often.

    Gareth: Yes that was an absolute travesty. I tried to contact people in the Diocese office to get the full story, but I couldn’t get much sense.

    Seriously sad that certain Catholics portray themselves as ‘progressive’ and ‘tolerant’, but couldn’t even tolerate the priests that have given up a great comfort of their lives and came to help US.

    Considering the above was the topic of a national television program, I think the Diocese and a few selfish individuals have seriously botched what should have been a great investment for the future of the wider Australian Catholic Church.

    Josh: Apparently he’s just knocked back an application for the “40 Days for Life” youth pro-life movement to be set up in Tasmania.

    Gareth: C’mon Josh, there are two sides to every story, not just what you hear at the gossip sessions after the TLM.

    Having said they, can’t say there is much happening in terms of pro-life activity down here. Not much happening from the top.

    Josh: I find Tasmanian Catholicism very inward-looking and seventies-feeling, more in line with the way things are in Queensland.

    Gareth: I concur with what you say and much of what you have written is the story of my own life, but I have a number of points to add. take them or leave them:

    1) Not only are the priests solely to blame for the state of the Tasmanian church, but also the clueless laity. In my experience, (which I am sure you would have learnt from your one year pastoral year as a Seminarian), the vast majority of the laity at local parish level are happy to actively go along with much of what the clergy support and also discourage anything productively being done at a local parish life and shun conservative Catholic families. The laity get the Church they deserve as well.

    2) You mentioned an energetic building up of priests, well where do you think they are going to come from?? In my experience, once a parish (including my own) loses its elderly priest retires or leaves and no-one is there to replace them, the parish is simply closed down. Priests are not going to fall out of the sky.

    3) How many candidates have conservative/orthodox Catholics put forward for vocations in Tasmanian in the past twenty years?? Can’t say many. I hear all this clamour, but not much action.

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